OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services

Safety • Empowerment • Healing
Respect • Support • Knowledge

OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services was established to provide a variety of services to UA students, staff, and faculty of all genders who are impacted by sexual assault, relationship violence, and stalking.

OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services is affiliated with Counseling and Psych Services, which is a unit of Campus Health Service, and is an active partner with Tucson community service agencies. Together with our campus and community partners, our mission is to respond to all forms of interpersonal violence.

Phone: (520) 626-2051


Our mission is:

  • To reduce the incidence of sexual assault and interpersonal violence in the UA community.
  • To coordinate and promote effective administrative, legal, medical, and therapeutic responses for students, staff and faculty.
  • To facilitate confidential reports on campus and promote data collection and research efforts.
  • To collaborate with, and provide coordinated responses between the campus and the surrounding community.

We are fully supported by the University of Arizona in its commitment to model creative leadership in promoting campus civility and mutual respect based on the principles and practices of nonviolence.

Our goal in offering counseling services is to contribute to the quality of the overall campus climate, to the safety, empowerment and healing of victim/survivors, to the accountability of offenders, to the success of students remaining productive in their role as students and in the pursuit of their degrees, and to the success of staff and faculty remaining productive in their role as employees. All services are voluntary. All counseling services are confidential, and the first two visits are free.

Advocacy
OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services offers advocacy to University of Arizona students, faculty, and staff who have been impacted by sexual assault, interpersonal violence, or stalking. Advocacy can include:

  • Academic advocacy: advocating for extensions of assignments, making up tests, excusing absences, withdrawing from coursework, requesting incompletes, requesting petitions for scholarship or financial considerations.
  • Housing advocacy, including advocating for changes in residence on campus.
  • Legal or judicial advocacy, including assistance in making a police report, filing a complaint with the Dean of Students Office, or obtaining a protective order.
  • Medical advocacy, including referrals to physicians experienced in treating injuries stemming from violence or assault.

Confidential Reporting
Some individuals want to file a report but do not want anyone to know that they have done so. If you are a victim of a crime and do not want to pursue action with the Dean of Students Office or with the police department, you may want to consider making a confidential report.

OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services is able to provide this service to students, faculty, and staff. With your permission, we can file a report on the basic details of the incident without revealing your identity.

The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with your wish to keep the matter confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety for yourself and others. With such information, the University can keep an accurate record of the number of incidents involving students, determine where there is a pattern of crime with regards to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the campus community to potential danger. Reports filed in this matter are counted and disclosed in the annual crime statistics for the UA.

Consultation
OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services staff is available to consult with individuals of the UA community regarding the issues of sexual assault, relationship/interpersonal violence, and stalking. Consultation can be done on the phone or in person. We often provide consultation to parents, faculty, staff, other students, and departments who are in contact with individuals who have been impacted by trauma. To consult with a staff member, you can call (520) 626-2051 and request to speak with either the counselor.

Trauma not only affects individuals directly, it can often affect those who interact with victims of interpersonal violence and assault. Consulting with a professional can be helpful for both yourself and the direct victim. Please feel free to consult with us regarding issues such as:

  • What do I do about my daughter telling me that her partner hit her?
  • As an instructor, how do I respond to a student disclosing that she was sexually assaulted?
  • Should I mind my own business?
  • How can I talk to my friend about his/her behavior?
  • What do I need to know to help my friend/daughter/son gain safety?
  • Are there things I should be doing to help my friend who was recently raped?
  • My girlfriend just disclosed that she was assaulted last year, I don’t know what this means regarding our future sexual relationship, are there things I need to know?
  • How do I suggest to my friend that she/he needs counseling?
  • What are the resources and steps to be taken to help my male friend who was assaulted/abused?

Counseling
Sexual assault, relationship violence, and stalking are complex and painful experiences which often require a combination of legal, medical, psychological, spiritual, familial, and personal responses. These events can disrupt a person’s life in many ways. Common feelings include fear, anxiety, rage, depression, and even guilt. Thoughts can be contradictory and confusing. Talking through the trauma soon after the event may prevent longer-term trauma-reactions. Following ANY trauma, people are encouraged to seek counseling within a week. For those individuals who have not chosen this option it is never too late to speak with a professional about a trauma experience.

Oasis Program Counseling

OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services offers counseling to University of Arizona students, faculty and staff who have recently been impacted by sexual assault, interpersonal violence, or stalking. Our services are available to men, women, and transgender persons. Psychological counseling for problems related to the impact of sexual assault, interpersonal violence, or stalking, crisis support, and safety planning are offered by OASIS counseling staff.

Individuals seek OASIS counseling services for many different reasons. OASIS counselors are skilled in dealing with emotional distress resulting from sexual assault, interpersonal violence, and stalking; trained to listen carefully and respectfully; and trained to facilitate conversations that might include:

  • Exploring medical and legal options (pressing charges, petitioning for a protective order, filing informal or confidential reports), and generating plans for safety
  • Ways to talk with others about what has happened or is happening to you
  • Identifying concerns about the harm done to you and understanding how it is affecting your life
  • Identifying healthy ways of coping with and healing from the harm that has occurred or that continues
  • Recognizing patterns and cycles of violence
  • Coping with a loved one’s/roommate’s/friend’s experience of assault or violence

Confidential Services

Our counseling services are confidential.* All interactions with an OASIS counselor, including scheduling of or attendance at appointments, content of your sessions, progress in counseling, and your records, are confidential. No record of counseling is contained in any academic, education, or job placement file. You may, however, request in writing that the counselor release specific information about your appointments to persons you designate.

There are a few exceptions to the rule of confidentiality. If OASIS believes you are immediately and seriously dangerous to yourself or to others, the staff is legally required to try to keep you safe and to warn anyone you might try to harm. Another circumstance in which the staff is required to break confidentiality is in the case of child or elder abuse. Lastly, a court order, issued by a judge, may require OASIS staff to release information contained in records and/or require a counselor to testify in a court hearing.

All counseling staff at Campus Health, including OASIS counselors, work as a team. Your OASIS counselor may consult with other Campus Health counseling staff to provide the best possible care. Other Campus Health counseling staff may view your OASIS counseling records, as needed, for consultation, supervision and continuity of care.

If you have specific concerns or questions about confidentiality, feel free to call OASIS and ask to talk to a counselor about your concerns or discuss them when you come for an intake interview.

*OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services is mandated by law to report incidents of abuse/assault of individuals under the age of 18.

Who provides the services?

Counseling services are provided by licensed mental health providers with training and experience working with individuals who have been impacted by sexual assault, interpersonal violence, and stalking. They are aware of the medical and legal options that are available to you and can help you develop a safety plan. They are also familiar with other services or programs on campus and in the community that may be helpful to you.

What can I expect?

Sometimes one session is all that is required, sometimes people come for several regular sessions, and sometimes people see a counselor intermittently over a period of time. This is something that is negotiated with the counselor and depends on many factors, including the types of issues being discussed and the purpose of seeing the counselor. You are free to stop counseling at any time.

You can expect to be:

  • Listened to with care and respect
  • Responded to honestly and respectfully
  • Informed about confidentiality
  • Informed of your rights and options
  • Informed of the risks of counseling
  • Treated in ways that are respectful of and sensitive to your cultural beliefs, religious beliefs, gender identity issues, and disabilities
  • Free to ask questions about the counselor’s training, experience, and ways of working with clients
  • Supported through advocacy when this would benefit you
  • Free to refuse to answer questions or discuss any aspects of your life that you do not feel are relevant or appropriate
  • Provided with assistance in securing alternative services if Oasis Program counseling services are not appropriate for your concerns or needs

How do I make an appointment?

The initial session, called an intake interview, is typically scheduled by appointment. Call OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services at (520) 626-2051 or go to the Counseling and Psych Services on the third floor of Campus Health at Highland Commons (near 6th and Highland) and request an appointment with an OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services counselor. If your situation is an emergency, you may request to be seen immediately. You may be asked to meet with a CAPS (Counseling and Psych Services) Triage counselor if an OASIS Sexual Assault  and Trauma Services counselor is not immediately available.

Referrals
OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services can make relevant referrals to providers and agencies that are likely to be beneficial to the individual seeking assistance. When an individual comes to OASIS wanting to address issues other than recent or ongoing interpersonal violence or sexual assault, or needs counseling services that are not provided by OASIS, a referral to another agency is made. All efforts are made to recommend services that will be cost effective, accessible, and reputable. OASIS staff can also make referrals for those individuals who do not wish to address sexual assault, relationship violence, or stalking with an OASIS staff member or with members of the UA community.

Frequent referrals made in the last year:

  • Medical providers for STI testing, HIV testing, pregnancy testing, and treatment of injuries
  • Legal assistance
  • Psychiatric services
  • Other mental health agencies or clinicians
  • Shelter services
  • Offender treatment

Emergency Help

If you are in imminent danger, are seriously injured and need medical assistance call 911 (even if you are on campus, calling 911 will connect you with law enforcement and emergency services).

If you are a UA student, faculty, or staff member:

OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services: (520) 626-2051

Community resources:

The Southern Arizona Center Against Sexual Assault
www.sacasa.org (520) 327-7273

Emerge! Center against Domestic Abuse
www.emergecenter.org 1-888-428-0101;1-888-472-1717

There are numerous agencies in the Tucson and campus community that can assist you if you have been impacted or are currently being impacted by sexual assault, unwanted sexual contact, relationship violence, or stalking.

Options For Individuals Impacted By Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence and Stalking

Sexual Assault

Sexual Assault/Unwanted Sexual Contact

As a survivor of sexual assault or unwanted sexual contact there are a number of options both on campus and in the community available to you. Help is available. You do not have to cope with this alone.

Medical Evaluation and Treatment

If you do not want to have evidence collected but you want medical treatment…

and you are a UA student:

UA Medical Services
At the Campus Health Service, same day care is available for UA students who have been sexually assaulted. These services are available during regular Campus Health hours. Campus Health houses a gynecology department with female providers who are sensitive to the issues of sexual assault.

It is also important for you to know that any exam by a CHS provider in the 72-120 hour window after an assault would interfere with any forensic evidence collection, and therefore could interfere with any legal proceedings you may decide to undertake. In addition, if you experience serious physical trauma and/or lacerations, it is best to be treated at an ER rather than at Campus Health, as CHS is not suited to handle such severe injuries.

If Campus Health Service is closed and you need immediate medical attention, you can visit any of the 24-hour care centers provided in the community section.

Community Medical Services
You can call your primary care physician or family doctor or go to a medical clinic for important medical care.

You can also visit any of the following 24-hour care centers:

Tucson Medical Center
5301 E. Grant (west of Craycroft)
(520) 527-5461

Northwest Medical Center
6200 N. La Cholla
(520) 742-9000

Banner University Medical Center
1501 N. Campbell
(north of Speedway)
(520) 694-8888

Financial reimbursement for hospital expenses is an option at Pima County Victim Services, but funding sources are limited:

http://www.pcao.pima.gov/victimservicesdivision.aspx

Tucson Medical Center has a quiet room and free extra clothing for survivors. The survivor does not have to wait in the lobby. Banner and Northwest Medical Center WILL refer to TMC which may be the best first option to avoid double billing.

* Important Note: Medical Providers are legally mandated to report treatment of material injury (injuries which are disclosed or discovered through examination or are suspected to have resulted from illegal or unlawful acts) to law enforcement.

What this means: If you speak with a medical provider about being sexually assaulted or physically harmed during an unlawful act, the medical provider must report this to law enforcement.
However, do not hesitate in seeking medical attention due to this. You do not have to make a report to law enforcement or comply with an investigation unless you want to. You can refuse to speak with law enforcement. You can refuse to give any other information about the offender or crime.

If you have questions or concerns about this you can contact OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services. OASIS is a confidential source for discussing your options.

Reporting

You have the option and the right to report the assault. There are different reasons people chose to report an assault and many survivors state that making a report was a valuable part of their healing. Although it is recommended to report the assault as soon as possible, an individual can make a report at any time after the assault has occurred.

To Make a Formal Report with Police
If you were sexually assaulted…

On campus or in a UA-owned facility, you can contact UAPD to report the assault at (520) 621-8273. UAPD officers and detectives are trained in responding to victims of sexual assault. Emergencies can also be reported by dialing 911 or by using one of the blue light telephones located throughout campus and parking structures. In an emergency, if you push the button on a blue light an officer will be dispatched. To learn more about UAPD click here.

Off-campus, you can call 911 contact Tucson Police Department to make a formal report of sexual assault.

To Make a Confidential Report

Some individuals want to file a report but do not want anyone to know that they have done so. If you are a victim of a violent crime on campus and do not want to pursue action with the Dean of Students Office or with the police department, you may want to consider making a confidential report. The Oasis Program is able to provide this service to students, faculty, and staff. With your permission, the Oasis Program can file a report on the details of the incident without revealing your identity. The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with your wish to keep the matter confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety for yourself and others. With such information, the University can keep an accurate record of the number of incidents involving students, determine where there is a pattern of crime with regards to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the campus community to potential danger. Reports filed in this matter are counted and disclosed in the annual crimes statistics for the UA.

UA Code of Conduct Complaint

If the person who assaulted you is a UA student, and the assault occurred on campus or at a university-sponsored event, you can file a Code of Conduct complaint against him or her.

The Code of Conduct at the University of Arizona outlines expectations for appropriate behavior. Included as prohibited behavior in the Code of Conduct is "intentionally or recklessly causing physical harm to any person on the University campus or at a University sponsored activity, or intentionally or recklessly causing reasonable apprehension of such harm."

Sexual assault is a serious offense that may result in a variety of university disciplinary actions. Students have the option of contacting the Dean of Students Office to make inquiries and to seek assistance regarding possible violations of the Code of Conduct by another student.

If a UA student files a complaint against another UA student regarding an incident on campus or at a UA-sponsored activity, the UA may pursue Code of Conduct charges against the accused student whether or not these charges are pursued by legal authorities and whether or not the student is convicted of these charges.

http://sexualassault.arizona.edu/counseling-services-ua

Emotional

Surviving a completed or attempted sexual assault will have an impact on your emotional, mental, and physical health. It can alter how you view yourself, how you view others, and how you view the world. It is normal to feel effects during the assault, after the assault, and over a considerable amount of time after the assault.

You do not need to face this alone. More often than not, seeking support from others is helpful. In addition to OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services and other community agencies, trusted friends or family can provide emotional support. You are not alone.

Counselors are trained in assisting individuals who are experiencing effects from completed and attempted sexual assault. Start talking to someone today.

If you are a UA student, faculty, or staff member you can seek mental health services at OASIS Sexual Assault and Trauma Services on campus or you can contact services in the community (see below).

If you are not a UA student, faculty, or staff member you can seek mental health services at the Southern Arizona Center Against Sexual Assault (520) 327-7273)

In addition, there are many community mental health providers including psychologists, licensed counselors, and licensed social workers that you can meet with to discuss the impact of sexual assault on your emotional/mental health. These individuals can be located either by calling your insurance carrier for recommendations for providers, or looking in the phone book under Counselors, Psychologists, Mental Health Services, or Psychologists.

To learn more about the emotional effects of sexual assault click here: Understanding Reactions to Traumatic Events (pdf)

To learn more about coping tips and other resources for college students who have experienced a disaster or trauma, click here: Tips for College Students After a Disaster or Trauma

Relationship Violence

Relationship violence includes physical, sexual, and emotional/psychological abuse (please see definitions). Given the diversity of the types of harm, there are often many different needs and thus different options for persons impacted by relationship violence.

Click on the subject below for more information:

I WILL/Step UP!

Medical

Legal

Emotional

Safety Planning

For Concerned Others

Stalking

Safety Plan
Reporting
Finding Help
For Concerned Others

National Resources